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10 occupations with on-the-job training

Alina Dizik, Special to CareerBuilder

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Not all careers require years of schooling; some jobs allow you to learn as you work. With almost no previous time investment, on-the-job training can be a great way to jump into a new career. Training can be anything from informal training sessions with your supervisor to regimented modules about how to succeed in the new role. Looking for a new position? Consider 10 occupations that provide on-the-job training:

1. Dental assistant

Working alongside the dentist leaves plenty of room to learn about the field of dentistry. Most dental assistants can find work without having to have a specialized degree, and many work flexible hours. In addition to less formal on-the-job training, those specializing in areas such as radiology may need to complete certifications.

2. Air traffic controller

In addition to attending the Federal Aviation Administration Academy to understand how air traffic is regulated, controllers also learn on the job. The training is extensive and takes between two to four years to complete. It helps workers home in on how to succeed at one of the key positions to keeping air traffic flowing smoothly.

3. Real estate broker

There's nothing like observing the sales tactics of others to be able to broker your own real estate deals. Most firms understand the importance of developing these soft skills and provide on-the-job training to new real estate agents. After completing official training, brokers assist more experienced real estate professionals before going off on their own.

4. Private Detectives

Working under the watchful eye of their more experienced counterparts gives detectives the chance to understand the subtleties of the job. The work is demanding, but the apprenticeship-style experience allows detectives to eventually start their own private practice.

5. Sales representatives

While natural sales skills are key, sales reps receive on-the-job training in order to understand the product or service they are selling. Working in direct competition with other sales representatives creates an ideal learning environment for less experienced hires.

6. Elevator repairer

As the technology in building elevators advances, repairers receive a fair amount of on-the-job training. Most repairers come in with only general technical knowledge and learn the ins and outs of the trade through a four-year apprenticeship program.

7. Baker

Baking for supermarkets and restaurants is a high-pressure job. No previous training is required, but bakers must learn how to meet strict deadlines and work in hot or even cramped conditions through apprenticeship-style work. Early morning hours are a must.

8. Forest firefighting and prevention supervisor

While a high school diploma is the norm, the bulk of the training comes from a fire department's own training facility. Those involved with forest fire prevention must go through an initial training period of several weeks and follow up with more targeted training sessions to perfect their skills.

9. Immigration inspector

While a college degree is necessary, the bulk of an immigration inspector's training occurs on the job and improves as inspectors deal with a variety of cases. Keeping up with new immigration laws can be difficult. After processing each application, immigration inspectors are expected to make a decision about the immigration status of each individual.

10. Talent director

Like most jobs in television and film production, being a talent director requires more on-the-job training than school smarts. Although a related degree is helpful, talent directors learn how to cast actors for productions through experience and apprenticeship-style training. Moving through different roles of the production team is how most talent directors prepare for the role.

Alina Dizik researches and writes about job search strategy, career management, hiring trends and workplace issues for CareerBuilder. Follow @Careerbuilder on Twitter.



Last Updated: 24/08/2011 - 12:17 PM


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