Find Jobs | Post Resume | my careerbuilder | Help

15 Jobs the Stimulus Plan May Boost

Selena Dehne, JIST Publishing

  • Email



"Our first job is to put people back to work."

President Barack Obama has declared this call to action time and time again when outlining the new administration's goals for rebuilding the economy. If the president's massive economic stimulus plan succeeds as hoped, an explosion of jobs will be created and saved to help recession-weary Americans rebound into the work force and get the economy back on track. 

But where can people expect to find these employment opportunities when job losses have swept nearly every industry and region across the nation?

In his recently released book, "Great Jobs in the President's Stimulus Plan," leading occupational expert Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., reveals which sectors and jobs are most likely to benefit from the president's policies. Shatkin also debunks the myth that the government will try to accomplish its re-employment goals by hiring a large number of people to work for the federal government. Instead, 90 percent of the jobs to be created or saved are expected to be in the private sector, Shatkin says.

"It's important to understand that the Obama team wants the coming upswing to be different from the 'jobless recovery' that followed the 2001 recession, in which businesses increased their profits without taking on many additional workers. Instead, as our country emerges from our current recession, we are expected to experience an era with many opportunities for employment. You need to be aware of the fields and jobs that are likely to grow and create a rewarding career for you," Shatkin says.

Below are several sectors and occupations that Shatkin says will benefit from the stimulus plan:

1. Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines
Percent growth: 12.3 percent
Level of education/training: Postsecondary vocational training
Sector: Energy

2. Mining and geological engineers, including mining safety engineers
Percent growth: 10.0 percent
Level of education/training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
Sector: Energy

3. Geophysical data technicians
Percent growth: 8.6 percent
Level of education/training: Associate degree
Sector: Energy

4. Construction managers
Percent growth: 15.7 percent
Level of education/training: Bachelor's degree
Sector: Infrastructure

5. Environmental engineering technicians
Percent growth: 24.8 percent
Level of education/training: Associate degree
Sector: Infrastructure

6. Electricians
Percent growth: 7.4 percent
Level of education/training: Long-term on-the-job training
Sector: Infrastructure

7. Physical therapist assistants
Percent growth: 32.4 percent
Level of education/training: Associate degree
Sector: Health care

8. Registered nurses
Percent growth: 23.5 percent
Level of education/training: Associate degree
Sector: Health care

9. Medical assistants
Percent growth: 35.4 percent
Level of education/training: Moderate-term on-the-job training
Sector: Health care

10. Special education teachers, secondary school
Percent growth: 8.5 percent
Level of education/training: Bachelor's degree
Sector: Education

11. Adult literacy, remedial education and GED teachers and instructors
Percent growth: 14.2 percent
Level of education/training: Bachelor's degree
Sector: Education

12. Library technicians
Percent growth: 8.5 percent
Level of education/training: Post-secondary vocational training
Sector: Education

13. Industrial machinery mechanics
Percent growth: 9 percent
Level of education/training: Long-term on-the-job training
Sector: Manufacturing

14. Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging and systems assemblers
Percent growth: 12.8 percent
Level of education/training: Long-term on-the-job training
Sector: Manufacturing

15. Industrial engineers
Percent growth: 20.3 percent
Level of education/training: Bachelor's degree
Sector: Manufacturing

*Percent growth figures are averages that apply to the period between 2006 and 2016.

Selena Dehne is a career writer for JIST Publishing who shares the latest occupational, career and job search information available with job seekers and career changers. She is also the author of JIST's Job Search and Career Blog (http://jistjobsearchandcareer.blogspot.com/).



Last Updated: 15/04/2009 - 4:21 PM


Article Reprints
Permission must be obtained from CareerBuilder.com to reprint any of its articles. Please send a request to reprints@careerbuilder.com.